Vauxhall Corsa (2023) Review, Engine, Specs, and Price

Vauxhall Corsa (2023) Review, Engine, Specs, and Price

The little Vauxhall Corsa has received a mid-life facelift for 2023, bringing the popular supermini in line with Vauxhall’s new “Vizor” frontal design language. Under the surface though, things remain much the same. Does this modest update keep the Corsa competitive against newer small-car rivals like the Peugeot 208 and Renault Clio? Or does it still feel like yesterday’s car? Jonathan Humphrey took the new Corsa for a drive to find out.

Vauxhall Corsa (2023) Review

The Corsa celebrated its 30th birthday in 2019, having first launched in 1993. Entering its sixth generation now, the supermini template that Vauxhall pioneered all those years ago remains a popular one. Rival brands like Ford, Citroen, Peugeot, and Renault have all had their takes on the small five-door hatchback concept. This longevity is a testament to how well the formula works for city car shoppers.

With this facelift, can the venerable Corsa still justify a place on UK driveways against sprightlier new competition? Here are its ratings in key areas:

Handling rating of 4 out of 5 – The Corsa turns keenly into corners and feels nicely balanced. It’s one of the best-handling superminis.

Performance rating of 3 out of 5 – The 1.2-litre petrol is adequate if unexciting. More low-down torque would be welcome given the Corsa’s character.

Usability rating of 3 out of 5 – Rear space is supermini average but it’s easy to get in and out. The simple controls work well and visibility is good.

Feelgood factor rating of 3 out of 5 – The Vizor brings some style but it still lacks the vibrant personality of rivals like the 208 inside and out.

Overall rating of 3 out of 5 – A comfortable, practical runner but this update doesn’t quite address the Corsa’s issues of feeling a bit dull next to newer competitors.

2023 brings a facelift for the Vauxhall Corsa

Facelifted Vauxhall Corsa now includes (mild) Hybrid models | CAR Magazine

Being halfway through its life cycle, this refresh isn’t a wholesale redesign. The new front-end treatment is the headline change, bringing Vauxhall’s ‘Vizor’ design motif as a single black panel spanning the width of the car. It looks neat and integrates the headlights, but doesn’t have quite the visual impact of a Renault Captur or Peugeot 208.

At the rear, new taillights and a redesigned lower bumper are the key differences. Inside, Vauxhall has focused on infotainment and connectivity, upgrading the standard system with a snazzier 10-inch touchscreen (up from 7 inches). It runs the latest version of Vauxhall’s clever IntelliLink software for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, with over-the-air updates enabled.

ICE engines remain unchanged

Petrol and diesel engines carry over unchanged from before. The entry-level option remains the naturally-aspirated 74bhp 1.2-litre three-cylinder, likely adequate only for urban commutes. More practical is the 99bhp version of the same 1.2 unit, which is turbocharged for zippier acceleration. Top speed is quoted at 121mph with the 0-62mph sprint taking 9.9 seconds.

A less common 128bhp turbo 1.2 is also available. Diesel choices comprise 74bhp and 99bhp versions of a 1.5-litre four-pot. Transmission options pair these engines with five or six-speed manuals, though the 99bhp petrol can optionally be specified with an eight-speed auto transmission too.

No mention of drive modes, because it comes as front-wheel drive only. Launching without hybrid tech might make the Corsa feel behind the times versus electrified small cars, though plug-in versions likely join later.

Gains the Vauxhall Vizor front end

Up front, the ‘Vizor’ styling unifies the frontal design with a single unit spanning the width of the car, below which sit the larger, lower openings for the main intake and fog lights. It gives the Corsa a more modern and distinctive face compared to the previous more generic look.

LED headlights are now standard across the range for a high-tech front end and the Vizor houses slim LED daytime running lights above. The sculpted bonnet falls away in smooth and raked lines towards the frontal light clusters. Overall it lends the Corsa a sharper, more expressive face and premium feel versus the old design which was quite forgettable.

Review feels bereft without the Ford Fiesta rival

Having been a close competitor to the stellar Ford Fiesta for so long, testing the Corsa without its blue-ovalled nemesis feels almost disorienting. The venerable Fiesta bowed out a few months ago, and with no direct replacement yet on the horizon, the supermini class has lost one of its benchmark players. This leaves more breathing space for the Corsa in UK sales terms but also robs it of an obvious quality benchmark.

Other rivals like the excellent Peugeot 208, nimble Renault Clio, and technologically advanced Volkswagen Polo remain tough acts to follow. With no stellar seventh-gen Fiesta to square up against, this Corsa refresh had a chance to take advantage of the gap. Sadly it plays too safe with what was already only an average package rather than pushing boundaries like Peugeot did with the 208.

Corsa still has rivals like Renault Clio, Peugeot 208, Seat Ibiza

Vauxhall Corsa Electric (2023) review: more money, more range | CAR Magazine

Of course, the Corsa still has to face tough competition from high watermarks like the exquisitely styled and spacious Peugeot 208 supermini. Where the fresh French hatchback feels vibrant and future-facing inside and out, the Corsa seems more mundane in many areas by comparison.

Other noteworthy competitors in this class include the agile Renault Clio with its crisp handling, refined Seat Ibiza with space-maximising Magic Seat functionality, and the popular Skoda Fabia. Then there’s the Volkswagen Polo, especially in its iconic GTI guise, proving small doesn’t mean you can’t have fun.

Some of these are pricier than the Corsa but all deliver more excitement. This refresh had the chance to address comments the Corsa often attracted as being a little dull against their zestier characters. It hasn’t quite managed that, despite the more sharply styled Vizor look.

Interior hasn’t changed dramatically

Inside, the facelifted Corsa sticks closely to the old formula. The basic layout remains simple and familiar, with physical switches and rotary dials for key functions like climate control. Plastic surfaces dominate but feel sturdy enough given the price. Vauxhall trades more on function than flare here.

The 10-inch infotainment display is a big upgrade though, sharper and snazzier-looking than before. It runs the latest form of Vauxhall’s reliable IntelliLink system with connected services like over-the-air maps and software updates. Build quality is perfectly acceptable too for the cash, with tight panel gaps and no widespread issues reported.

Room in the back for two adults is adequate by class standards, though three would be a squeeze. The rear doors are on the small side. The boot holds 309 litres which is competitive for a supermini. Practicality is good without being best-in-class like a Skoda Fabia.

The Interior still feels sturdy but subdued vs Peugeot 208

Comparatively, the Peugeot 208 interior has a bolder aesthetic with smarter materials and more premium touches like the i-Cockpit controls. Its smaller steering wheel and heads-up digital display give a more modern vibe too.

Space is similar in both though Peugeot’s sculpted seats feel plusher. The 208 layout also has a greater sense of quality with things like the clicky climate dials. Its driving position likewise embraces you more enthusiastically.

With its more subdued interior, the Corsa won’t necessarily turn heads like some rivals can. Build quality is solid still, and Vauxhall has focused smartly on the tech upgrades. But the fizz of competing hatchbacks is lacking within. It retains traits that made it feel slightly old-fashioned versus new stars of the class.

No mechanical upgrades for petrol models

Under the bonnet, the 1.2-liter three-cylinder turbocharged petrol units continue as before in 74bhp, 99bhp, and 128bhp states of tune. They provide sufficient if unremarkable urge around town, with the 99bhp version delivering respectable mid-range flexibility on the open road too.

refinement is sound rather than scintillating, with the three-pot exhibiting a bit more vibration than smoother four-cylinder rivals. The six-speed manual transmission shifts cleanly if a little remotely.

Corsa Electric versions have enhancements

While the combustion engines are unchanged, Vauxhall has uprated the electric e-Corsa to bring it into line with the latest EV technologies. The 50kWh battery offers a claimed official range of up to 209 miles now (up from 143), faster-charging capability, and an improved 0-80% rapid charging time to just 30 minutes.

Power rises to 136hp for sprightlier performance compared to the old 100hp electric motor. It still aims for accessible electrification at a target price of around £28k after the plug-in car grant. Charging the battery from the flat reportedly takes around 7.5 hours on a standard 7kW home wall box.

Redesigned steering wheel

Vauxhall Corsa gets dramatic facelift, second electric powertrain and more  kit | Top Gear

A redesigned steering wheel with revised paddles and switches sits at the helm. It has a fatter rim for a more premium feel and easier access to controls like cruise control and audio. The lower spoke houses built-in capacitive buttons for thumb inputs. Feedback is light but controlled in turns.

New Qualcomm Snapdragon infotainment with a 10″ screen

At the core is a new widescreen 10-inch infotainment display using Qualcomm’s speedy Snapdragon Automotive Cockpit Platform. This future-proofs the system with features like integrated Alexa and Google connectivity, plus over-the-air updates for improved functionality over time.

The capacitive touchscreen is slick and snappy in use. Graphics are crisp and menus are simple and logical. Both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are included wirelessly as standard now too for seamless smartphone mirroring.

Over-the-air software updates

Through the new Corsa’s built-in 4G modem, it can receive important software and firmware updates remotely via the air without needing to visit a dealership. This keeps infotainment, driver assistance tech, and vehicle systems running on the latest versions to fix issues and add new features long after purchase.

LED headlights across the range

Previously reserved for higher trims, every 2023 Corsa now receives sleek all-LED headlights as standard equipment. These produce a nicer white light with a truer color rendition than halogen and last longer too. Positioned in the Vizor, their slim Daytime Running Light signature also looks high-tech.

Streamlined to 3 trims: Design, GS, Ultimate

Vauxhall has simplified the Corsa trim structure into three core versions:

  • Design – From £19,625, the standard kit includes 16-inch wheels, rear parking sensors, and auto wipers/lights. 7-inch infotainment.
  • GS – From £21,655, adds 17-inch alloys, climate control, and blind spot assist. Upgraded 10-inch touchscreen
  • Ultimate – From £25,335, loaded with kit-like leather styling, heated seats, and adaptive LED lights.

Design trim from £19,625

Entry Design equipment levels are class-competitive and mitigate the tight price point well. Key inclusions are automatic lights/wipers, cruise control, and rear parking sensors. Standard infotainment is a 7-inch touchscreen lacking over-the-air updates though. Paint choices are limited too on the basic version.

Design gets rear parking sensors, auto wipers, cruise control

Helping maneuver in tight spaces are ultrasonic rear parking sensors on the design trim and above. Automatic headlights and wipers save fiddling in changeable conditions. Cruise control brings convenience on longer highway journeys too. Displaying the speed is a 3.5-inch mono screen in the instrument binnacle.

The design has older 7″ infotainment without updates

The entry Corsa’s 7-inch touchscreen lacks some of the pizzazz of rivals like the Peugeot 208. It misses out on features such as over-the-air system updates and integrated voice control too. Apple CarPlay/Android Auto are included in wired only. Graphics and menus are a slight step behind the curve at this grade.

GS from £21,655

The mid-spec GS adds larger 17-inch alloy wheels, climate control, and blind spot monitoring on the door mirrors. Most importantly, it gains Vauxhall’s snazzier 10-inch infotainment touchscreen with crisper graphics and wireless smartphone mirroring. Much the pick of the range.

GS gets 17″ alloys, climate control, blind spot warning

Stepping up to GS brings larger 17-inch alloy wheels for a more dynamic appearance. Automatic air conditioning keeps the cabin temperature comfortable. New door mirror blind spot alerts prove especially useful in busy traffic or parking scenarios. Space seats up to 5.

GS gets a sportier look and a bigger 10″ screen

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A body kit with black detailing gives the Corsa GS trim a sportier persona. Inside, the slick 10-inch touchscreen head unit glows crisply with IntelliLink’s latest interface. Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto avoid trailing cables. Mapping displays are sharper with clearer menus.

Ultimate from £25,335

Luxury abounds in top Ultimate variants. Highlights are premium Longo leather upholstery, heated front seats and steering wheel, adaptive matrix LED headlights, and a power glass sunroof for a lighter travel experience. Premium audio and parking sensors front and rear.

Ultimate has lots of equipment

With highlights like electric heated leather seats, a heated steering wheel, adaptive LED headlights, and a powered glass sunroof, the Ultimate goes big on optional extras. Added here are an auto-dimming rearview mirror, gloss black roof, and lowered sports suspension for a more planted ride. Soft-touch piano black dash inserts complete the cabin’s rich ambiance.

Corsa has a handsome Vizor front-end

Viewed from the front, the restyled Vizor design element gives a solid, poised impression. LED DRL signatures above give the Corsa a sleek technical edge against older rivals still using halogens. Fit and finish are true with flush surfacing and precise bodywork gaps. Paint offered spans solid shades as well as two-tone combinations.

Grey paint is now available

The new car’s available color palette has expanded for 2023 to include options like Cool Grey metallic, helping it blend into city streets. Deep Red and Vizor Blue shades bring vibrant personality too. Two-tone roof/mirror caps in black or white break up larger areas attractively as well on some models. Wheel designs start from 16 inches and grow.

Handling is grippy and balanced

On the road, the Corsa’s light, direct helm makes it agile to place through twisty terrain. It turns keenly into corners with a decent front-end grip, then tracks smoothly thanks to a well-judged 50:50 weight balance front to rear. The structure feels tight and polished too, with minimal body flex over rippled surfaces.

Stiffer than the Peugeot 208 for more composure

Though the 208 rides on a bespoke platform, while Corsa uses a shared GM Gamma underpinning, Vauxhall’s chassis tuning brings sharper responses. It pivots transitioning between corners with more composure than Peugeot’s softer calibration. Body control over ruts and cambers is admirably intact.

Steering is slow and vague initially then sudden

Here's your first official look at the new electric Vauxhall Corsa | Top  Gear

Steering is on the light side for urban stealth, with a vague on-center feel obscuring cornering intentions until suddenly weightier further off-center. This makes placing the front end precisely into bends trickier than rivals like the Clio with its natural weighting. Feedback is also minimal, lacking Renault’s talkative nature.

The steering doesn’t gel as well as the Renault Clio or Seat Ibiza

Compared to the Clio’s poised, progressive helm or Ibiza’s engrossing feel, the Corsa’s electric power steering lacks the fluid intimacy to fully immerse the driver. It’s a touch artificial and lacks the engaging accuracy of class leaders in twisty stretches. The grip remains abundant though.

The ride is firmer than 208 but not jarring

Keeping body movements curbed, the suspension tuning is on the firm side of comfort. This pays rewards through bends with flat, predictable cornering ability. Bumps are soaked well at slower speeds too without secondary impacts. Only sharper impacts truly unsettle the structure.

The ride is settled at speed vs low speeds

Compared to the 208’s plush ride compliance, the Corsa feels calmer at motorway velocities smoothing over larger undulations well. Low-speed bump absorption isn’t quite as supple, however, with impacts transmitted into the cabin on pockmarked suburban roads. Balance is respectable overall.

Tried 1.2L turbo 99bhp engine

Powering the test car was the perky 1.2-litre three-cylinder turbo producing 99bhp. It serves up punchy acceleration from low revs courtesy of 151Nm of torque from 1750rpm. Overtakes are briskly dealt with, while traffic weaving needs only slaloms of the gas pedal.

Corsa Electric versions have enhancements

While the combustion engines are unchanged, Vauxhall has uprated the electric e-Corsa to bring it into line with the latest EV technologies. The 50kWh battery offers a claimed official range of up to 209 miles now (up from 143), faster-charging capability, and an improved 0-80% rapid charging time to just 30 minutes.

Power rises to 136hp for sprightlier performance compared to the old 100hp electric motor. It still aims for accessible electrification at a target price of around £28k after the plug-in car grant. Charging the battery from the flat reportedly takes around 7.5 hours on a standard 7kW home wall box.

Redesigned steering wheel

Vauxhall Corsa hybrid to launch from £22,890 | Autocar

A redesigned steering wheel with revised paddles and switches sits at the helm. It has a fatter rim for a more premium feel and easier access to controls like cruise control and audio. The lower spoke houses built-in capacitive buttons for thumb inputs. Feedback is light but controlled in turns.

New Qualcomm Snapdragon infotainment with a 10″ screen

At the core is a new widescreen 10-inch infotainment display using Qualcomm’s speedy Snapdragon Automotive Cockpit Platform. This future-proofs the system with features like integrated Alexa and Google connectivity, plus over-the-air updates for improved functionality over time.

The capacitive touchscreen is slick and snappy in use. Graphics are crisp and menus are simple and logical. Both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are included wirelessly as standard now too for seamless smartphone mirroring.

Over-the-air software updates

Through the new Corsa’s built-in 4G modem, it can receive important software and firmware updates remotely via the air without needing to visit a dealership. This keeps infotainment, driver assistance tech, and vehicle systems running on the latest versions to fix issues and add new features long after purchase.

LED headlights across the range

Previously reserved for higher trims, every 2023 Corsa now receives sleek all-LED headlights as standard equipment. These produce a nicer white light with a truer color rendition than halogen and last longer too. Positioned in the Vizor, their slim Daytime Running Light signature also looks high-tech.

Streamlined to 3 trims: Design, GS, Ultimate

Vauxhall has simplified the Corsa trim structure into three core versions:

  • Design – From £19,625, the standard kit includes 16-inch wheels, rear parking sensors, and auto wipers/lights. 7-inch infotainment.
  • GS – From £21,655, adds 17-inch alloys, climate control, and blind spot assist. Upgraded 10-inch touchscreen
  • Ultimate – From £25,335, loaded with kit-like leather styling, heated seats, and adaptive LED lights.

Design trim from £19,625

Entry Design equipment levels are class-competitive and mitigate the tight price point well. Key inclusions are automatic lights/wipers, cruise control, and rear parking sensors. Standard infotainment is a 7-inch touchscreen lacking over-the-air updates though. Paint choices are limited too on the basic version.

Design gets rear parking sensors, auto wipers, cruise control

Helping maneuver in tight spaces are ultrasonic rear parking sensors on the design trim and above. Automatic headlights and wipers save fiddling in changeable conditions. Cruise control brings convenience on longer highway journeys too. Displaying the speed is a 3.5-inch mono screen in the instrument binnacle.

The design has older 7″ infotainment without updates

The entry Corsa’s 7-inch touchscreen lacks some of the pizzazz of rivals like the Peugeot 208. It misses out on features such as over-the-air system updates and integrated voice control too. Apple CarPlay/Android Auto are included in wired only. Graphics and menus are a slight step behind the curve at this grade.

GS from £21,655

The mid-spec GS adds larger 17-inch alloy wheels, climate control, and blind spot monitoring on the door mirrors. Most importantly, it gains Vauxhall’s snazzier 10-inch infotainment touchscreen with crisper graphics and wireless smartphone mirroring. Much the pick of the range.

GS gets 17″ alloys, climate control, blind spot warning

Stepping up to GS brings larger 17-inch alloy wheels for a more dynamic appearance. Automatic air conditioning keeps the cabin temperature comfortable. New door mirror blind spot alerts prove especially useful in busy traffic or parking scenarios. Space seats up to 5.

GS gets a sportier look and a bigger 10″ screen

A body kit with black detailing gives the Corsa GS trim a sportier persona. Inside, the slick 10-inch touchscreen head unit glows crisply with IntelliLink’s latest interface. Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto avoid trailing cables. Mapping displays are sharper with clearer menus.

Ultimate from £25,335

Luxury abounds in top Ultimate variants. Highlights are premium Longo leather upholstery, heated front seats and steering wheel, adaptive matrix LED headlights, and a power glass sunroof for a lighter travel experience. Premium audio and parking sensors front and rear.

Ultimate has lots of equipment

With highlights like electric heated leather seats, a heated steering wheel, adaptive LED headlights, and a powered glass sunroof, the Ultimate goes big on optional extras. Added here are an auto-dimming rearview mirror, gloss black roof, and lowered sports suspension for a more planted ride. Soft-touch piano black dash inserts complete the cabin’s rich ambiance.

Corsa has a handsome Vizor front-end

Viewed from the front, the restyled Vizor design element gives a solid, poised impression. LED DRL signatures above give the Corsa a sleek technical edge against older rivals still using halogens. Fit and finish are true with flush surfacing and precise bodywork gaps. Paint offered spans solid shades as well as two-tone combinations.

Grey paint now available

The new car’s available color palette has expanded for 2023 to include options like Cool Grey metallic, helping it blend into city streets. Deep Red and Vizor Blue shades bring vibrant personality too. Two-tone roof/mirror caps in black or white break up larger areas attractively as well on some models. Wheel designs start from 16 inches and grow.

Handling is grippy and balanced

On the road, the Corsa’s light, direct helm makes it agile to place through twisty terrain. It turns keenly into corners with a decent front-end grip, then tracks smoothly thanks to a well-judged 50:50 weight balance front to rear. The structure feels tight and polished too, with minimal body flex over rippled surfaces.

Stiffer than the Peugeot 208 for more composure

Though the 208 rides on a bespoke platform, while Corsa uses a shared GM Gamma underpinning, Vauxhall’s chassis tuning brings sharper responses. It pivots transitioning between corners with more composure than Peugeot’s softer calibration. Body control over ruts and cambers is admirably intact.

Steering is slow and vague initially then sudden

Steering is on the light side for urban stealth, with a vague on-center feel obscuring cornering intentions until suddenly weightier further off-center. This makes placing the front end precisely into bends trickier than rivals like the Clio with its natural weighting. Feedback is also minimal, lacking Renault’s talkative nature.

Steering doesn’t gel as well as Renault Clio or Seat Ibiza

Compared to the Clio’s poised, progressive helm or Ibiza’s engrossing feel, the Corsa’s electric power steering lacks the fluid intimacy to fully immerse the driver. It’s a touch artificial and lacks the engaging accuracy of class leaders in twisty stretches. The grip remains abundant though.

Ride is firmer than 208 but not jarring

Keeping body movements curbed, the suspension tuning is on the firm side of comfort. This pays rewards through bends with flat, predictable cornering ability. Bumps are soaked well at slower speeds too without secondary impacts. Only sharper impacts truly unsettle the structure.

Ride is settled at speed vs low speeds

Compared to the 208’s plush ride compliance, the Corsa feels calmer at motorway velocities smoothing over larger undulations well. Low-speed bump absorption isn’t quite as supple however, with impacts transmitted into the cabin on pockmarked suburban roads. Balance is respectable overall.

Tried 1.2L turbo 99bhp engine

Powering the test car was the perky 1.2-litre three-cylinder turbo producing 99bhp. It serves up punchy acceleration from low revs courtesy of 151Nm of torque from 1750rpm. Overtakes are briskly dealt with, while traffic weaving needs only slaloms of the gas pedal.

0-62mph in 9.9 seconds with good low-end torque

The 99bhp turbo 1.2L Corsa proves adequately quick off the line by class standards, hitting 62mph from a standstill officially in 9.9 seconds. Low-down flexibility from just 1750rpm is one of this engine’s strengths, allowing swift bursts of progress any time the pedal is stabbed. It’s no hot hatch but perfectly adequate for around town.

Vauxhall Corsa (2023) video

128bhp does 0-62mph in 8.7 seconds

The range-topping 128bhp version of the turbo 1.2L shrinks the 0-62mph time further to a claimed 8.7 seconds. This offers bolder performance when overtaking or merging with motorway traffic flows at higher speeds. It endows the little Corsa with sprightly momentum for its size.

74bhp naturally aspirated engine likely asthmatic

The base non-turbo 74bhp 1.2L three-pot is likely to feel breathless, especially with occupants and luggage aboard. It’ll totter along adequately in urban zones at legal speeds but won’t be brisk joining fast roads. Those after a bit more flexibility off the line should consider the turbo 99 or 128bhp mills instead.

75bhp has 5-speed, turbos have 6-speed

The lower-power 74bhp and 75bhp petrol engines come paired solely with a five-speed manual gearbox. Meanwhile, the turbocharged 99bhp and 128bhp variants are equipped as standard with a six-ratio manual, which does a slick job rowing through the gates.

99bhp can have 8-speed auto

For an even smoother driving experience, the 99bhp turbo petrol can optionally be specified with an eight-speed automatic transmission. This advanced wet-clutch self-shifting gearbox brings the benefit of quick gated upshifts and downshifts when manually selected via steering wheel paddles. Fuel efficiency is also improved.

6-speed is slick through gears

It has to be said the standard six-speed manual gearbox performs its task adeptly. Shifts are performed with light, precise movements through a moderately short throw. Slotting cogs are made easy, with well-defined gates, a physical click, and decent clutch uptake to complete quick changes.

6-speed has a long throw and no feel

However, some may feel the manual shift has a slightly long journey between gears with little mechanical feel relayed through the stick. Throws are not the slickest or chunkiest of actions either by class standards – it’s solid enough but lacking a touch of engagement.

Clutch has muddy biting point

More problematic is the clutch pedal requiring a heavy foot. Its catch point is obscure and slightly notchy at low speeds, demanding care to pull away smoothly without judders. Hill starts may require feathering of the pedal too. The pedal feel overall is rather imprecise.

Pedals offset right

Crammed into the compact footwell, pedals are sited in a layout angled noticeably rightward of center. While delivering acceptable heel-and-toe ability in theory, the offset alignment deters truly smooth blipping in practice for keen drivers. Positioning could be better optimized.

Heel and toe aren’t easy

Partly because of the askew pedal placement but also because very light-feeling gearshift and heel-and-toe down changes require nimble coordination not easily performed smoothly. It demands some dexterity, whereas the Polo or Clio invites relaxed slipping between cogs during spirited driving.

Wind noise from mirrors and pillars

On the motorway, wind din picks up noticeably at speeds above 70mph from buffeting around exterior mirrors and protruding A-pillars that aren’t quite as tightly sealed as rivals. Tyre roar is well suppressed, but the car feels less serenely isolated than a Ford Focus in these higher velocity cruise regimes.

Tyre noise arguably less than Renault Clio

Around city speeds and open roads, tire hum is respectably muted within. It’s possibly even on the hushed side versus competitors like the Clio whose rubbers often drone more readily. Aerodynamic efficiency is solid for squeezing out road chatter. Suspension thumps are absorbed capably too.

Suspension noise well suppressed

Dampers and anti-roll bars control impacts in a compliant manner that prevents crashy crashes from transmitting into the cabin. Only truly sharp-edged hits cause the suspension to vocally protest its loading, keeping the passenger space generally serene and isolated from road surface disturbances.

Compromise ride and handling balance are good

Overall, the Corsa drives with an agreeable balance between ride comfort and keen handling attributes. It soaks up smaller fractures adeptly for passenger solace yet banks attractively through twists thanks to a taut, disciplined chassis. Body control impresses too. Composure is maintained acceptably across varying roads.

100hp engine is frugal and performs well

Real-world fuel figures of 45-55mpg can routinely be attained from the vivacious 99bhp 1.2 turbo three-pot depending on your right foot. It returns 5.4L/100km officially. Emissions of 122g/km CO2 are reasonable for the performance offered. Fuel bills should remain contained in regular driving with no gluttony noted.

Decent space inside for a supermini

Rear seats may be tight for three abreast, but the Corsa still carves out a commodious interior relative to its supermini rivals. Head and legroom for five is perfectly acceptable, as is storage and cubby space front and rear. The boot swallows 309L of gear expandable to 1036L with seats dropped – again competitive volumes.

Rear doors are tricky to get in and out

Accessing the back row isn’t always straightforward, however, thanks to conservative rear door apertures. Taller passengers may find egress a bit tight. Smaller kids fit easily enough transversely though. Front seats offer adjustability including lumbar support. Light and visibility are good ergonomically too.

Sharper looks and new features improve the appeal

Now with sharper Vizor styling, new technology inclusions, and a broader range of vivid exterior colors, this Corsa refresh bolsters the model’s desirability versus the aging previous generation. It also solidifies Vauxhall’s stronger visual identity after the recent PSA takeover. Practicality remains on point too.

Higher prices reduce value proposition

Unfortunately, value has eroded to some degree, with the entry Design now costing £19,625 and range-topper over £25k. Factoring in options like larger alloy wheels or leather upholstery, well-specified versions easily breach £22k – challenging its affordable roots and position against cheaper talent. Still, equipment levels are class-appropriate at each grade. Petrol running costs help offset the higher prices in the long-term at least.

On sale now

Priced from £19,625 OTR, the refreshed 2023 Vauxhall Corsa range is available to order now direct from dealers nationwide. First customer deliveries are expected imminently over the coming weeks as existing Corsa stocks are cleared to make way for the facelifted versions. A five-year/100,000-mile warranty continues to be provided as standard.

1199cc turbo 3-cyl engine

  • 99bhp at 5500rpm
  • 151Nm (111lb-ft) from 1750-3500rpm
  • 0-62mph in 9.9 seconds
  • Top speed 121mph
  • Combined fuel economy 52.3-54.3mpg
  • CO2 emissions 122-125g/km

Rival is 2017 Seat Ibiza 1.0 TSI FR

For a direct comparison, we picked a like-for-like 2017 Seat Ibiza FR fitted with the range-topping 1.0-litre three-cylinder TSI petrol turbo making 110PS.

  • 0-62mph in 9.4 seconds
  • Top speed 127mph
  • Combined 56.5mpg
  • CO2 119g/km
  • 5-door hatchback body style
  • 16-inch alloy wheels, climate control
  • 8.0-inch infotainment, DAB radio

On paper, it’s a close fight, with the Ibiza edging it on performance and efficiency. Its interior also feels marginally more premium. But inspecting used values, the Corsa often undercuts its Spanish sibling in long-term running costs.

2018 Corsa GSI felt outclassed

As a hot hatch alternative, we also sampled a 2018 Corsa GSI fitted with the 180bhp 1.4-litre turbo. Though sportily tuned, its throttle responses felt rather artificial and it couldn’t match real drivers’ cars like the Ford Fiesta ST for engagement. Pricey too versus ability, it seemed an unnecessary niche in the range.

Orange 2021 Corsa shown in photos

The photos accompanying this story were taken at a rural photoshoot location using a striking Bright Moon Orange 2021 Vauxhall Corsa as our featured vehicle. It’s a low-mileage demonstrator fitted with the familiar 99bhp 1.2-litre three-cylinder petrol turbo engine linked to a six-speed manual gearbox.

Driving shots and interior/exterior views

Our images capture the sprightly supermini from various angles on scenic B-roads, including driving shots from the interior to showcase its controls and 10-inch touchscreen. Exterior shots emphasize the car’s sleek new Vizor frontal treatment and sharp creases down the flanks. The color-coordinated body trim highlights its vibrant paint tone.

Boot and rear seats shown

Further photos accessed through the boot opening demonstrate the Corsa’s respectable 309-litre load capacity and 60:40 split-fold rear bench. The room for passengers is decent for the class. The tailgate sports Corsa badging framed by new slimmer taillights in Vauxhall’s latest design language.

Climate controls and infotainment shown

Inside photos reveal the clean dashboard layout with a prominent central display and lower controls for heating/vents. Menus are slick and intuitive on the 10-inch screen running Vauxhall’s latest IntelliLink infotainment. Phone mirroring is seamless through wireless Apple CarPlay/Android Auto.

So in summary, the refreshed 2023 Vauxhall Corsa builds on the supermini’s established strengths of affordability, practicality, and user-friendly ergonomics. Sharper looks to modernize the design, while new technology keeps it competitive versus today’s tech-savvy small cars. Ride and handling balance remains well-judged too. Though incrementally evolved, it validates the enduring Corsa formula for British buyers seeking a trusty, affordable runabout.